Chapter 1
Figure 1.1. The Norwegian education system 0–18 years.
Figure 1.2. Schools – by pupil numbers. 2003–2013. Numbers.
Figure 1.3. Distribution of schools and pupils – by number of pupils at each school. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 1.4. Changes in the number of private primary and lower secondary schools between 2002 and 2013. Figures for private primary and lower secondary schools abroad from 2006. Numbers.
Figure 1.5. Number of foreign languages per school. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 1.6. Pupils taking optional subjects – by gender. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 1.7. Pupils receiving special Norwegian tuition and other special language tuition. 2002–2013. Numbers.
Figure 1.8. Pupils and apprentices in upper secondary education and training as at 1 October 2013 – by level and pathway. Numbers.
Figure 1.9. Pupils on general study programmes – by level. 2013/14.
Figure 1.10. Applicants for vocational study programmes at Level Vg1. As at March 2014. Numbers.
Figure 1.11. Adults receiving ordinary tuition and special needs education. 2008/09–2013/14. Numbers.
Table 1.1. Primary and lower secondary schools – by ownership type. 2013/14. Numbers.
Table 1.2. Private primary and lower secondary schools. 2013/14. Numbers.
Table 1.3. Ordinary distribution of teaching hours for pupils in Years 1–10, applicable to all pupils from the 2014/15 academic year.
Table 1.4. Pupils studying optional subjects in Year 8 and Year 9. 2013/14. Numbers and percentage.
Table 1.5. Private upper secondary schools. 2013/14. Numbers.
Table 1.6. Pupils on general study programmes – by study programme. As at 1 October 2013, preliminary figures. Numbers.
Table 1.7. Pupils and apprentices on vocational study programmes – by study programme. As at 1 October 2013. Preliminary figures. Numbers.
Table 1.8. Oversubscription and undersubscription at Level Vg1 – by study programme. As at 1 March 2014. Numbers.
Table 1.9. Participants in upper secondary education and training aged 25 or older. 2008/09-2012/13. Numbers.
Table 1.10. Adult participants in upper secondary education and training – by study programme. Study programmes in the Knowledge Promotion curriculum. 2012/13. Preliminary figures. Numbers.
Chapter 2
Figure 2.1. Municipalities and children attending kindergarten – by municipal spending per kindergarten child. 2013. Preliminary figures. Percentage.
Figure 2.2. Municipalities and children attending kindergarten – by municipal spending per older child with a full-time place. 2013. Preliminary figures. Percentage.
Figure 2.3. Operating costs per pupil – by expenditure on primary and lower secondary schools, school premises and school transport. 2013. Preliminary figures. NOK.
Figure 2.4. Municipalities and pupils – by operating costs per pupil in primary and lower secondary. Municipal primary and lower secondary schools. 2013. Preliminary figures. Percentage.
Figure 2.5. Expenditure per pupil in upper secondary education and training. 2013. Preliminary figures. NOK.
Figure 2.6. Expenditure per pupil – by study programme. Adjusted for inflation and wage increases. 2013. Preliminary figures. NOK.
Figure 2.7. Indirect costs per pupil – by county. 2013. Preliminary figures. NOK.
Figure 2.8. Teaching hours per pupil for ordinary tuition, special needs education and special language tuition.
Figure 2.9. Class sizes in an ordinary teaching situation – by average school size. 2013/14. Numbers.
Figure 2.10. Teacher FTEs filled by teachers without approved teacher status. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 2.11. Level of education among upper secondary teachers – by county. Q4 2012. Percentage.
Figure 2.12. Municipalities spending more than 15% of teaching hours on special needs education. 2006/07–2013/14. Numbers.
Figure 2.13. Teaching hours per pupil receiving special language tuition in the form of special Norwegian tuition, mother tongue tuition, bilingual subject tuition and adapted language tuition. 2006/07–2013/14. Numbers.
Figure 2.14. Cost per pupil. Norway and the OECD average. 2000–2010. Figures in USD adjusted for purchasing power.
Figure 2.15. Cost per pupil in the OECD. 2010. Figures in USD adjusted for purchasing power.
Chapter 3
Figure 3.1. Kindergarten children – by age group. 2003–2013. Numbers.
Figure 3.2. Children aged 0–2 years not entitled to a kindergarten place who attend kindergarten – by private and municipal kindergartens. 2010–2013. Numbers.
Figure 3.3. Children attending kindergarten – by kindergarten size. 2009–2013. Percentage.
Figure 3.4. Proportion of private kindergartens – by county. 2013. Percentage.
Figure 3.5. Educational background of kindergarten staff. 2009–2013. Percentage.
Figure 3.6. Educational background of kindergarten staff – by county. 2009–2013. Percentage.
Figure 3.7. Kindergartens meeting the minimum teacher-to-child ratio, both with and without dispensation from the qualifications requirement. 2009–2013. Percentage.
Figure 3.8. Kindergartens meeting the minimum teacher-to-child ratio without dispensation from the qualifications requirement – by county. 2009 and 2013. Percentage.
Figure 3.9. Kindergartens in municipalities meeting the minimum teacher-to-child ratio with pedagogical leaders with approved kindergarten teacher status. 2013. Percentage.
Table 3.1. Enrollment rate of children attending kindergarten. 2009–2013. Percentage.
Table 3.2. Enrollment rate of minority language children attending kindergarten. 2009–2013. Percentage.
Chapter 4
Figure 4.1. Proficiency levels in national Year 5 tests – by county. 2013. Average.
Figure 4.2. Proficiency levels in national Year 8 tests – by gender. 2013. Percentage.
Figure 4.3. Proficiency levels in national Year 5 numeracy tests – by parents' level of education. 2013. Percentage.
Figure 4.4. Exemptions from national tests. 2008–2013. Percentage.
Figure 4.5. Average point score from compulsory education – by county. 2012/13.
Figure 4.6. Year 10 exam results – by subject and gender. 2012/13. Average.
Figure 4.7. Distribution of grades in Year 10 written exams – by gender. 2012/13. Percentage.
Figure 4.8. Written exam results in Year 10 – by parents' level of education. 2012/13. Average.
Figure 4.9. Written exam results and coursework grades in selected core subjects. 2012/13. Average.
Figure 4.10. Differences between coursework grade and exam result – selected subjects. 2009/10-2012/13. Percentage.
Figure 4.11. Results from apprenticeship and journeyman's examinations – by study programme. 2012/13. Preliminary figures. Numbers and percentage.
Figure 4.12. PISA results. 2000–2012. Average.
Figure 4.13. Performance levels in mathematics. 2003-2012. Percentage.
Chapter 5
Figure 5.1. Percentage of pupils experiencing support from most or all teachers. 2013.
Figure 5.2. Relations between teachers and pupils. Percentage of pupils who agree with the statements. 2003, 2009 and 2012.
Figure 5.3. Percentage who say that the phenomena impede pupils' learning “to a certain extent” or “greatly”. 2000-2012. Percentage.
Figure 5.4. Pupils who experience support from home. Proportion who say “always” or “sometimes”. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 5.5. Experience of academic challenges and accomplishment, Year 10. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 5.6. Pupils' motivation. Proportion of pupils giving positive responses to the statements. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 5.7. Degree to which pupils find school relevant. Percentage of pupils who “slightly” or “completely” agree with the statements. 2013/14.
Figure 5.8. What pupils gain from school. Percentage of pupils who agree with the statements. 2003–2012. The individual items show the OECD average in 2012.
Figure 5.9. Percentage of pupils whose well-being at school is good or very good. By year group. 2013/14.
Figure 5.10. Harassment and bullying – by year group. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 5.11. Differences in bullying between girls and boys. 2013/14. Percentage points.
Figure 5.12. Incidents that the school is aware of, and incidents that the school does something about. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 5.13. Apprentices who are bullied – by study programme. 2013. Percentage.
Chapter 6
Figure 6.1. Changes in the highest qualification held (16 to 66 years of age). Percentage.
Figure 6.2. Successfully completed within 5–6 years – by study programme. 1998-2006 cohorts. Percentage.
Figure 6.3. Successfully completed within 5–6 years – by county. 2006 cohort. Percentage.
Figure 6.4. Pupils and apprentices who successfully complete within 5–6 years and 10 years after enrolling in upper secondary education or training – 1994–2002 cohorts. Percentage.
Figure 6.5. Successfully completed upper secondary education or training – by qualifications and measuring stage. 2002 cohort. Percentage.
Figure 6.6. Qualifications obtained by those who do not successfully complete and pass within 5–6 years (2006 cohort). Percentage.
Figure 6.7. Successfully completed within 5–6 years – by average point score from compulsory education. 2006 cohort. Percentage.
Figure 6.8. Successfully completed within 5–6 years – by average point score from compulsory education and study programme. 2006 cohort. Percentage.
Figure 6.9. Qualifications obtained after 5–6 years – by average point score from compulsory education. 2006 cohort. Percentage.
Figure 6.10. Transitions to and through upper secondary education and training. 2012. Percentage.
Figure 6.11. Transitions from Vg2 on vocational study programmes to the third year of training. 2012. Percentage.
Figure 6.12. New apprenticeship contracts as at 1 October. 2008–2013. Numbers.
Figure 6.13. Trade certificate obtained two, three, four, and five years after starting an apprenticeship. Percentage.
Figure 6.14. Status two, three, four, and five years after starting an apprenticeship. 2008 cohort. Percentage.
Figure 6.15. Trade certificate obtained two and five years after starting an apprenticeship – by county. 2008 cohort. Percentage.
Figure 6.16. Employment status as at November 2012 for skilled workers obtaining trade/journeyman's certificates in the 2011/12 academic year – by candidate category. Percentage.
Figure 6.17. Employment status as at November 2012 for apprentices/pupils obtaining trade/journeyman's certificates in the 2011/12 academic year – by county. Percentage.
Figure 6.18. Employment status as at November 2012 for apprentices/pupils obtaining trade/journeyman's certificates in the 2011/12 academic year – by study programme. Percentage.
Figure 6.19. Newly qualified skilled workers in employment as at November in the first year after obtaining a trade/journeyman's certificate as an apprentice/pupil – by study programme. Percentage.
Figure 6.20. Newly qualified, skilled workers in employment in the first, second, and third year after obtaining a trade/journeyman's certificate as an apprentice/pupil. Percentage.
Figure 6.21. Young people that have not completed, and are not participating in upper secondary education and training. Percentage.
Figure 6.22. Employment status for young people aged 16 – 25 that have not completed, and are not participating in upper secondary education and training. Percentage.
Figure 6.23. Young people referred to the Follow-up Service – by county. Percentage.
Figure 6.24. Status for young people referred to the Follow-up Service in the period June 2011– June 2013. Percentage.
Figure 6.25. Young people in the Follow-up Service target group in 2011/12 who are in education and/or employment in the next academic year – by county. Percentage.
Table 6.1. Achieved trade certificates two, three, four and five years after, by study program. 2008 cohort. Percent.
Chapter 7
Figure 7.1. Pupils in primary and lower secondary with individual decisions on special needs educa-tion. 2004/05 to 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 7.2. Pupils with individual decisions on special needs education – by year group. 2012/13 and 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 7.3. Reduction in the proportion of pupils receiving special needs education in schools with increased teacher-to-pupil ratios compared with the rest of the country – by year group. 2011/12 and 2013/14. Percentage points.
Figure 7.4. Pupils with individual decisions on special needs education – by year group and gender. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 7.5. Pupils with individual decisions on special needs education – by county. 2012/13 and 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 7.6. Pupils receiving special needs education – by municipality size. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 7.7. Pupils in primary and lower secondary with individual decisions on special needs education – by hours with teaching staff and hours with teaching assistant. 2013/14. Numbers.
Figure 7.8. Pupils receiving special needs education within ordinary classes, in small groups, or alone with a teacher or teaching assistant. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 7.9. Pupils receiving special needs education within ordinary classes, in small groups, or alone – by municipality size. 2013/14. Percentage.
Figure 7.10. Pupils in dedicated units and pupils receiving special needs education in the largest municipalities. 2013/14 academic year. Percentage.
Figure 7.11. Applicants for a specific study programme. As at 1 March 2014. Percentage
Figure 7.12. Pupils registered with planned basic qualifications – by county. As at 1 October 2013. Preliminary figures. Percentage.
Figure 7.13. People registered with planned basic qualifications – by study programme. As at 1 October 2013. Preliminary figures. Percentage.
Figure 7.14. Training candidates – by study programme. As at 1 October 2012 and 2013. Numbers.
Figure 7.15. Proportion of training candidates among the total number of apprentices and training candidates – by county. As at 1 October 2013. Percentage.
Figure 7.16. Specialist FTEs at the PPT – by specialism. 2012/13 and 2013/14. Percentage.
Table 7.1. Kindergarten children with decisions on special educational support. 2010–2013. Numbers and percentage.
Table 7.2. Subsidy applications for apprentices and training candidates with special needs. 2011–2013. Numbers.